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Limited time promotion Classic Corvette Canvas Print

November 9th, 2014

Classic Corvette Canvas Print by Edward Fielding - Purchase a 10.00" x 8.00" stretched canvas print of Edward Fielding's Classic Corvette for the promotional price of $50.

Limited to the first 10 buyers, expires in five days.

corvette Photography Prints

Free Photography Magazine

November 9th, 2014

Free to read online or download! The latest issue of Arcangel Magazine featuring the artwork of fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding.

http://www.joomag.com/en/newsstand/arcangel-photographer-presentations-edward-fielding/0047799001410258471

All images the magazine are available for purchase as art prints from Fine Art America and can be licensed for use in publications, music CDs or book covers via Arcangel.

Photography Tips Shooting Vintage Cars

April 24th, 2014

Photography Tips Shooting Vintage Cars

I love old cars. Beautifully restored or rusting junkers, I never miss the opportunity to capture a beautiful old vintage car. Either as a nostalgic throwback to a yesterday that I was too young to remember (except in the movies or TV show) or simply as documenting beautiful textures of pitted metal, cracked rubber and rust – my camera and I are there!

1. Watch out for reflections -The shiny waxed finishes on a restored vintage car can be a nightmare to photograph because of all the reflections. Often the photographer ends up in the shot! Time to be creative with angles as well as being on the look out for distracting elements such as reflections.

2. Get in close for details – Fins, wheels, emblems, interiors, engines – there are all kinds of details that can be captured on a beautiful old car. Besides typically at at car show its hard to get with all of the people milling around.

3. Ask for permission – At car shows you might notice that the car owners get a bit nervous when you approach their car. Basically this is their baby and they spend a lot of time polishing and buffing these beauties. What they really don’t want to see is someone marring the finish with fingerprints or horror of all horrors, scratching the finish with a belt buckle. Be friendly to the owners and chat them up a bit. Gain their trust and them perhaps they’ll be more inclined move the “for sale” sign or take out their lunch from the back seat so you can get a great photograph.

More of this article at: http://edwardfielding.me/2014/04/23/photography-tips-shooting-vintage-cars/

The Last Resort Fine Art Photographs of Maui Hawaii has been released

January 30th, 2014

I just release my small book of black and white fine art photographs of Maui Hawaii as a book and as an ebook for the iPad. All images from this book are available to purchase as prints via Fine Art America -http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/edward-fielding.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=382174

I was born in Hawaii but didn't get a chance to return for 45 years. I wondered if this island of paradise would live up to the hype from images of Hawaii 5-0 and the Brady Bunch Go To Hawaii.

The Last Resort - photographs of Maui

January 28th, 2014

The Last Resort - photographs of Maui

I'm currently working on my second book of photographs to be released soon. "The Last Resort" will contain black and white photographs of Maui, Hawaii by Hawaiian born photographer Edward M. Fielding and is inspired by the Eagle's song "The Last Resort".

Maple Sugaring Season

January 10th, 2014

Maple Sugaring Season

NEW - Four images from this series will be shown at the Whitney Center for the Arts in the March 2013 Photography Show.

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I've just uploaded a small series of images taken around New Hampshire and Vermont during maple sugaring season. The images depict the traditional methods of gathering raw maple tree sap and boiling it down into sweet liquid gold. The maple sugaring season runs at the end of winter, beginning of spring when the nights are still cold but the days begin to warm and the trees start to wake from their hibernation.

Maple syrup is an all natural product and buying the real stuff contributes to a traditional way of life that has supported generations of farmers in rural areas. Don't by the mass produced sugar water produced by the national chains! Buy the real stuff! Each image in the series has information about the process, please stop by and enjoy the series! Thanks, Ed

http://edward-fielding.artistwebsites.com/art/all/maple+sugaring+in+new+england/all

Cover Bridges of New Hampshire and Vermont

November 2nd, 2013

Anyone remember a little book called "The Bridges of Madison County"? Never read the book but I saw the romance movie by the same name with Clint Eastwood as the Life Magazine photographer sent out to Madison.

As photographer Robert Kincaid, Clint wanders into the life of housewife Francesca Johnson, for four days in the 1960s and while hubby and the kids are off at the Illinois state fair, Meryl Streep and Clint make the most of the old claw foot tub if I remember the movie correctly.

Well I've been acting a bit like a modern day Kincaid lately. Minus the asking lonely, horny farm wives for directions of course. I mean I've been driving all over the New Hampshire and Vermont area, crawling down steep banks and setting up tripods on slippery rocks in order to capture the romantic covered bridges that we have in abundance in these here parts.

Yup, in this neck of the woods - the Upper Valley - we have a bunch of classic wooden bridges. Some original and some restored after nearly being lost in Tropical Storm Irene.

At one time there were over 10,000 covered bridges in the United States, and today 54 of the remaining 750 are located in New Hampshire. Located throughout the state, each bridge is unique to its town and design. Because of their beauty and the history behind them, covered bridges became the first type of historic structures specifically protected by state law in New Hampshire.

Vermont has the highest concentration of covered bridges at an astonishing 114 for such a small state. Why covered bridges?

Wooden bridges with exposed superstructures are vulnerable to rot. Covering and roofing them protects them from the weather, and so they last longer.

In one sense, that just puts off the question. Why so many wooden bridges? And why in the U. S. Northeast?

In eighteen hundred, the northeastern United States was a country in need of bridges. It is a fairly narrow coastal plain cut by many short rivers and creeks. In the "tidewater" region, these little streams and the great estuaries such as the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays had been highways and lifelines. But now the population was surging beyond the tidewater region, drawn both by the growth of agriculture and the call of water-powered industrialization. Inland farmers needed overland transport, and that meant fords or bridges. But the water-powered mills sought out the very places where the streams could not be forded -- the falls and rapids -- and they too needed transportation.

So bridges were needed. The American northeast was a forest country: wood was a plentiful building material, especially in the remote areas where the smaller bridges were needed. And the climate favored wooden construction. The climate of the region is harsh, by European standards -- hot in the summer and icey in the winter, with a freeze-thaw cycle that would overturn stone pavings. But this sort of climate is less destructive of wood than the mild, moist climate of Britain (or Oregon). So wooden bridges there would be.

The young United States had one other necessary ingredient in plenty: ingenuity. Lewis Wernwag, Theodore Burr, Menander Wood and the rest were just as essential as the material and the need. Without them, there would be no historic covered bridges.

As we enjoy our heritage, we honor the memory of those agile minds who created it.

Vintage Television Studio Camera

November 27th, 2012

I love old things. Like this old television studio camera for example. Look at the size of this beast! They just don't make them like they used to. This example of 1950s technology came out of the John F. Kennedy library in Boston, MA. The original shot was taken in terrible museum lighting. In order to get a workable image I painstakenly cut out the television camera with Abobe Photoshop and then massaged the image in Topaz Labs using some High Dynamic Range (HDR) effects. The result is kind of hyper real, almost illustration-like but I like how it brought out all the details in this old workhorse of a 1950s television studio.

Fur - an imagined life of Diane Arbus

November 27th, 2012

If you're looking for a good movie with a photography theme check out Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus (also known simply as Fur). I've had this film on my Netflix movie "q" for years but never got around to seeing it until now.

Fur is a 2006 film starring Nicole Kidman as iconic American photographer Diane Arbus, who was known for her strange, disturbing images and the always wonderful Robert Downey, Jr. as a neighbor who leads Arbus out of her straight laced world into the world of strange, bizarre, forbidden people.

I've always been a big fan of Arbus's square format, black and white images of midgest, circus perormers, nudiest and mental patients in Halloween masks and have read Patricia Bosworth's biography on Diane Arbus so I have a good idea of the real life work and storyline of Diane Arbus. The fictional movie uses the real story but embellishes the events and characters that formed Arbus's journy towards the strange.

The movie is gripping and full of mystery, from its startling opening showing a nervous Arbus visiting a nudist colony to the scenes of her discovering a full completment of freak show characters living in the neighborhood.

For someone growing up in a wealthy, protected, perfect world the desire for the damaged, torn, imperfect lead her on a journey with her photography of the under belly of society and in the end it claimed her life as she could not merge the world she was groomed to live and the life she desired to live.


This movie was interesting with all of its vintage photography equipment and strange characters but it left me yearning for a true documentary about Diane Arbus.

Behind the scenes look at how Fine Art America works

November 15th, 2012

Behind the scenes look at how Fine Art America works

Sean Broihier: I'm the only programmer, and built the entire business. The only people full time on Fine Art America are myself and two women who do customer service and tech support for me via phone and email. That's three of us full time on the payroll. In addition, we outsource the actual production of prints to companies around the U.S. For example, we have a company in North Carolina that does framed prints and stretch canvasas for us, and in Atlanta we have greeting cards, and a company in Hawthorne which is doing our acrylic prints. I worked for ten years as an engineer, and my job was factory automation, which is designing automated machinery to assembly cars, food, beverages, packaging, pharmaceutical packaging, and so on. I am obsessed with automation. I built this business to be fully automated. I built the website, so that it's all do-it-yourself. Artists can control all the content, set the prices, and it's all fully automated with no need for a staff to interact with. The whole order process is fully automated. We process credit cards or PayPal, and instantly transmit orders to fulfillment centers around the U.S. Their staff takes care of the order, and it ships in two or three days, and it's all fully integrated back into our system which ships, tracks the information, and sends out an email confirmation to the buyer that their order has shipped, and so on and so on.

Everything in a transaction, from start to finish, is fully automated. Thirty days later, the payment is all fully automated to the artists. Half of our artists receive their payments via PayPal, and at a click of the button on my end, thousands and thousands of PayPal payments are sent out. The other half is paid via business check, and we mail them out using a checkwriting service, where with a click of a button we send out thousands of checks. The whole thing, start to finish, is fully automated. The beautiful part of that it allows us to do X dollars of sales currently, and we could ramp to 20X tomorrow and we wouldn't have to bring anyone else onto staff. Our fulfillment can handle any volume sent through them.

 

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